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  Radio Program notes and schedules for the "Clear Channel Group".
Rural Radio began in February, 1938 and was intended to promote the programming of a group
of America's wide coverage clear channel radio and regional coverage stations. It merged with Radio Varieties in 138
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Rural Radio merged with
Radio Varieties in October of 1939.
   
The Clear Channel Group and Rural Radio Magazine
(Speaking of Edwin Craig, President of the corporation that founded WSM in Nashville and Jack DeWitt, the engineer who built the station)
 
...Craig and De Witt had emerged by the mid-1930's as not only important independent broadcasters but leading advocates for the interests of high-powered radio stations nationally. In May 1934, Craig invited representatives from his fellow clear channel radio stations to a meeting in Chicago. fourteen of them, including WLW and m:yor stations in Atlanta (WSB), Chicago (WGN and WLS), Los Angeles (KFI and KNX), Dallas/Fort Worth (WFAA and WBAP), and New Orleans (WWL), established the Clear Channel Group and elected Craig its chairman. DeWitt would become its chief engineering consultant.
The CCG's campaign in Washington to make 500,000-wtt stations routine was ultimately uusuccessful but the lobby did preserve their exclusive signals over many years, in the face  of constant pressure from smaller broadcasters to end the clear channel system. In 1937, Craig spearheaded a major reorganization of the much larger National Association of Broadcasters, further extending his influence inside the radio world.
Craig pursued a public relations strategy as well, including a consumer/listener magazine called Rural Radio. Conceived and edited by Ed Kirby and written by publicity agents from the CCG stations, the inaugural issue, in February 1938, offered itself to America's fifty million rural residents, "the back hone and breadbasket of the nation."
Craig pursued a public relations strategy as well, including a consumer/listener magazine called Rural Radio. 
Conceived and edited by Ed Kirby and written by publicity agents from the CCG stations, the inaugural issue, in February 1938, offered itself to America's fifty million rural residents, "the back hone and breadbasket of the nation." Tailored for the whole family, it offered a bit of technical know-how, recipes. and tidbits for kids. A WSM engineer wrote about "how to get more from your radio set." Handy Annie advised homemakers to periodically wash electric light bulbs, because "clean bulbs give more light." Readers wrote back with homespun admiration. "I think it is the grandest little magazine I ever saw," raved a Kentucky woman. A Georgia reader indicated he was glad to see "not so much Hollywood stuff Keep it that way!"  Rural Radio didn't last long, not because demand was weak, but because Kirby, the magazine's mastermind, got an offer that moved him along from Nashville. The National Association of Broadcasrers, now sixteen years old and growing into a formidable force in Washington, capped Kirby to direct its public relations deparunent. Neville Miller had gone from the muddy mayor's office in Louisville to the head of the NAB. so he'd already made a warm bond with Kirby.  For Kirby, the work was not far from what he'd been doing at National Life, except it was on a national stage, as radio continued to grow in importance. Ed and Marjorie left Rural Radio in the hands of its printer, where it didn't stand much of a long-term chance, and moved to Washington in the fall of 1938.
From "Air Castle of the South" by Craig Havighurst